Sherae Daniel

Headshot of Sherae Daniel

Sherae Daniel

Associate Professor, Department of Operations, Business Analytics, and Information Systems

3322 Carl H. Lindner Hall

513-556-7175

Sherae L. Daniel is an Assistant Professor of Operations, Business Analytics and Information Systems in the Carl H. Lindner College of Business at the University of Cincinnati. She earned her Ph.D. in Information Systems from the Robert H. Smith School of Business at the University of Maryland. Sherae’s research seeks to reveal how to best manage collaboration challenges in nontraditional work environments. In particular, she seeks to uncover the keys that will unlock doors to future success for OSS collaborators. Sherae’s research has been published or is forthcoming in premier outlets such as Information Systems Research, MIS Quarterly, and the Journal of Association for Information Systems. She is a member of the Association for Information Systems.

Download vita.

Teaching Interest
Introduction to Information Systems, Excel, Spreadsheet Analytics, Database

Research Interest
Open source software, virtual teams

Awards | Honors
Organization: University of Cincinnati
Name: Spring 2018 Dean's List of Teaching Excellence
Year Received: 2018

Organization: University of Cincinnati
Name: Fall 2017 Dean’s List of Teaching Excellence
Year Received: 2017

Name: IS Women's Network:  Advancing Women in IS Academia workshop
Year Received: 2014

Name: Academy of Management Organizational Behavior Outstanding Reviewer Award
Year Received: 2009

Name: University of Pittsburgh Grant
Year Received: 2009

Organization: University of Pittsburgh
Name: University of Pittsburgh International Business Center Grant
Year Received: 2009

Name: AMCIS Doctoral Consortium
Year Received: 2007

Name: AT&T Labs Fellow, 2002-2007
Year Received: 2007

Name: KPMG Peat Marwick Foundation Doctoral Scholarship, 2002-2007
Year Received: 2007

Name: OCIS AOM Doctoral Consortium
Year Received: 2007

Education
Institution: University of Maryland
Completed: 2007
Degree: Ph D

Institution: Carnegie Mellon University
Completed: 2001
Degree: BS

Institution: Carnegie Mellon University
Completed: 2001
Degree: MS

Published Contributions
Sherae Daniel, Vishal Midha, Anol Bhattacherjee, Shivendu Singh,  (2018). Sourcing Knowledge in Open Source Software Projects:  The Impacts of Internal and External Social Capital on Project Success. Journal of Strategic Information Systems.

Sherae Daniel, Katherine Stewart,  (2016). Open source project success:  Resource access, flow, and integration. Journal of Strategic Information Systems, 159-176.

Sherae Daniel, Pratyush  Sharma, Rachel Chung,  (2015). The Impact of Person-Organization Fit and Psychological Ownership on Turnover in Open Source Software Projects.

Sherae Daniel, Ritu Agarwal, Katherine Stewart,  (2013). The Effects of Diversity in Global, Distributed Collectives:  A Study of Open Source Project Success . Information Systems Research.

Sherae Daniel, Likoebe Maruping, Marcelo Cataldo, James Herbsleb,  (2011). When Cultures Clash:  Participation in Open Source Communities and its Implications for Organizational Commitment. International Conference of Information Systems.

Sherae Daniel, Ilana Diamant,  (2010). Learning in Open-Source Software (OSS) Development:  How Developer Interactions in Culturally Diverse Projects Impact the Acquisition of Collaboration- and Learning Skills. International Conference on Information Systems.

Sherae Daniel, Anna Sidorova, Shobha Chengalur-Smith,  (2010). Sustainability of Free/Libre Open Source Projects:  A Longitudinal Study.

Sherae Daniel, Pratyush Sharma, Rachel Chung,  (2010). The Impact of Person-Organization Fit on Turnover in Open Source Software Projects.

Sherae Daniel, Katherine Stewart, David Darcy, (2006). Opportunities and Challenges Applying Functional Data Analysis to the study of Open Source Software. Statistical Science.

Accepted Contributions
Sherae Daniel, Likoebe Maruping , Marcelo Cataldo ,  (Accepted). Developer Centrality and the Impact of Value Congruence and Incongruence on Commitment and Code Contribution Activity in Open Source Software Communities. Management Information Systems Quarterly.

Sherae Daniel, Likoebe Maruping , Marcelo Cataldo , James Herbsleb ,  (Accepted). THE IMPACT OF IDEOLOGY MISFIT ON OPEN SOURCE SOFTWARE (OSS) COMMUNITIES AND COMPANIES . Management Information Systems Quarterly.

Sherae Daniel, Katherine Stewart,  (Accepted). Implications of Alter Project Resources and Participant. International Conference of Information Systems.

Research in progress
Title: A Motivation-Hygiene Model of Open Source Software Code Contribution and Growth over Time:  Understanding the Role of Developer Fit and Payment
Description: Motivation for contributing to open source software development has largely been based on shared values. However, the increasing prevalence of payments to developers has created a challenge in balancing psychological and economic motivations. Experts argue about whether paying OSS developers helps or hurts projects because imbursement dampens the impact of intrinsic motivation. As the variety of motivations increases, managers face difficulty in understanding what to expect from developers over time. Using Herzberg’s motivation-hygiene framework, we theorize how developers’ perceptions of fit with the project and being paid to work interact to determine the level and growth of code contribution over time (trajectory). Using a survey of 564 developers working on 431 projects on the GitHub platform, we build a three-level growth model explaining the code contribution and its growth over a six-month period. We find that both fit with the project and being paid positively impact the level and growth of code contribution. However, there are differences in the impact of fit between paid and unpaid developers with regard to their level and growth of code contribution. Specifically, fit has a stronger positive impact on the level of code contribution for paid developers compared to unpaid developers. In contrast, for unpaid developers fit has a stronger impact on the growth of code contribution over time compared to paid developers. The implications of our work can be of interest to researchers, practitioners and organizations investing in open source projects.
Status: Writing Results
Research Type: Scholarly

Title: A signaling theory perspective of OSS developer job mobility
Status: On-Going
Research Type: Scholarly

Title: Collaboration in Community Source Software Development Projects:  Role of Work Structure and Time
Description: Community source software development (CSSD) is a type of information systems development (ISD) approach in which a group of organizations commit resources to create enterprise-level systems that are freely distributed following open source software (OSS) distribution principles. There has been little or no research that examined how members of a CSSD project collaborate to achieve successful task completion. We collected a unique dataset from one of the largest CSSD initiatives—Kuali Foundation—to understand how members of a CSSD project collaborate using an online communication and workflow tool to accomplish their tasks. We also examined the influence of work structure characteristics, e.g., geographic dispersion, task assignment, task interdependence and goal clarity, on collaboration patterns. We found that local members, individuals who are collocated and have access to face-to-face interactions, communicated and participated more through the online collaboration tool than remote members to accomplish a task. We also found that under certain conditions (e.g., when there is high task interdependence and goal clarity) remote members increased their communication and participation efforts. Using the lens of punctuated equilibrium, we offered explanations for why CSSD project members overall participated more after the midpoint (e.g., closer to deadline) for tasks that have a clear deadline (i.e., high goal clarity). Further, we found that the interplay between different work structure characteristics led to different collaboration patterns over time. Based on our findings we developed a set of propositions that are applicable to CSSD projects and other projects that are structured similarly.

Title: Exploring the Tension between the Firm, the Open Source Software Community, and the Developer
Description: In this research, we are interested in understanding how a firm’s relationship with the OSS community impacts the developer’s relationship with their firm. Accordingly, we draw on the job embeddedness model because it specifically seeks to explain why employees stay with a firm. We plan to test our theoretical model using both archival and survey data. In answering our research question, we extend the research on OSS and job embeddedness. We offer guidance to firms and developers who seek to engage in OSS communities and provide insight to those who lead OSS communities. In particular, we hope to offer ideas for how a manager can retain software developers who make contributions to OSS communities.
Status: On-Going
Research Type: Scholarly

Title: Implications of Alter Project Resources and Participant Roles for Open Source Software Project Commercial Success
Description: An open source software (OSS) project’s connections to other projects influences its success. This paper extends the prior work on network effects by taking a more comprehensive view of the types of ties that connect projects and accounting for variations in the resources held by alter projects. Drawing on the attention literature, we argue that garnering attention from key stakeholders (e. g. , active users) is a crucial aspect of success for projects. We hypothesize that projects will therefore benefit more from connections to alter projects that are rich in attention than those that are attention-poor. Further, we develop hypotheses about how the roles occupied by the individual forming a tie between projects (i. e. , whether that person is a code contributor or an active user) impacts the extent to which the tie draws attention to the focal project. Three hypotheses are empirically supported in a sample of 250 OSS projects.
Status: On-Going
Research Type: Scholarly

Title: Single and Double-Loop Learning:  Linking Open Source Software Developer Motivation, Contribution and Turnover Intentions
Description: Under Review at Information Technology & People
Status: On-Going
Research Type: Scholarly

Title: The impact of ethnic homogeneity on AirBnB host success
Status: Planning
Research Type: Scholarly