Eli Awtrey

Headshot of Eli Awtrey

Eli Awtrey

Assistant Professor, Department of Management

3352 Carl H. Lindner Hall

513-556-4582

I conduct research and teach classes about the people side of management, including topics such as leadership development, team dynamics, decision making, and emotions. Prior to academia, I spent 10+ years in non-profit management with a focus on leadership development. I also have substantial additional experience in IT, communications, and market research.

Teaching Interest
Organizational behavior, teamwork, leadership

Research Interest
Teams, leadership, networks, emotions

Awards | Honors
Organization: Academy of Management Review
Name: Finalist, AMR Best Paper of 2017
Year Received: 2018

Education
Institution: University of Washington
Location: Seattle, WA
Major: Business Administration
Dissertation: The microdynamics of team diversity and collaboration networks
Completed: 2018
Degree: Ph D

Institution: University of Washington
Location: Seattle, WA
Major: Business Administration
Completed: 2013
Degree: MS

Institution: University of Oregon
Location: Eugene, OR
Major: Business Administration
Completed: 2010
Degree: MBA

Institution: University of Oregon
Location: Eugene, OR
Major: Magazine Journalism
Completed: 1998
Degree: BS

Published Contributions
R. Silberzahn, E. Uhlmann, D. Martin, P. Anselmi, F. Aust, Eli Awtrey, Š. Bahník, F. Bai, C. Bannard, E. Bonnier, R. Carlsson, F. Cheung, G. Christensen, R. Clay, M. Craig, A. Rosa, L. Dam, M. Evans, I. Cervantes, N. Fong, M. Gamez-Djokic, A. Glenz, S. Gordon-McKeon, T. Heaton, K. Hederos, M. Heene, A. Mohr, F. Högden, K. Hui, M. Johannesson, J. Kalodimos, E. Kaszubowski, D. Kennedy, R. Lei, T. Lindsay, S. Liverani, C. Madan, D. Molden, E. Molleman, R. Morey, L. Mulder, B. Nijstad, N. Pope, B. Pope, J. Prenoveau, F. Rink, E. Robusto, H. Roderique, A. Sandberg, E. Schlüter, F. Schönbrodt, M. Sherman, S. Sommer, K. Sotak, S. Spain, C. Spörlein, T. Stafford, L. Stefanutti, S. Tauber, J. Ullrich, M. Vianello, E.-J. Wagenmakers, M. Witkowiak, S. Yoon, B. Nosek,  (2018). Many Analysts, One Data Set:  Making Transparent How Variations in Analytic Choices Affect Results. Advances in Methods and Practices in Psychological Science, .

Ryan Fehr, Ashley Fulmer, Eli Awtrey, Jared Miller,  (2017). The grateful workplace:  A multilevel model of gratitude in organizations. Academy of Management Review, 361--381.

Warren Tierney, Martin Schweinsberg, Jennifer Jordan, Deanna Kennedy, Israr Qureshi, S. Sommer, Nico Thornley, Nikhil Madan, Michelangelo Vianello, Eli Awtrey, Luke Zhu, Daniel Diermeier, Justin Heinze, Malavika Srinivasan, David Tannenbaum, Eliza Bivolaru, Jason Dana, Clintin Davis-Stober, Christilene du Plessis, Quentin Gronau, Andrew Hafenbrack, Eko Liao, Alexander Ly, Maarten Marsman, Toshio Murase, Michael Schaerer, Christina Tworek, Eric-Jan Wagenmakers, Lynn Wong, Tabitha Anderson, Christopher Bauman, Wendy Bedwell, Victoria Brescoll, Andrew Canavan, Jesse Chandler, Erik Cheries, Sapna Cheryan, Felix Cheung, Andrei Cimpian, Mark Clark, Diana Cordon, Fiery Cushman, Peter Ditto, Alice Amell, Sarah Frick, Monica Gamez-Djokic, Rebecca Grady, Jesse Graham, Jun Gu, Adam Hahn, Brittany Hanson, Nicole Hartwich, Kristie Hein, Yoel Inbar, Lily Jiang, Tehlyr Kellogg, Nicole Legate, Timo Luoma, Heidi Maibeucher, Peter Meindl, Jennifer Miles, Alexandra Mislin, Daniel Molden, Matt Motyl, George Newman, Hoai Ngo, Harvey Packham, P. Ramsay, Jennifer Ray, Aaron Sackett, Anne-Laure Sellier, Tatiana Sokolova, Walter Sowden, Daniel Storage, Xiaomin Sun, Jay Van Bavel, Anthony Washburn, Cong Wei, Erik Wetter, Carlos Wilson, Sophie-Charlotte Darroux, Eric Uhlmann,  (2016). Data from a pre-publication independent replication initiative examining ten moral judgement effects. Scientific Data, 160082 EP -.

Martin Schweinsberg, Nikhil Madan, Michelangelo Vianello, S. Sommer, Jennifer Jordan, Warren Tierney, Eli Awtrey, Luke Zhu, Daniel Diermeier, Justin Heinze, Malavika Srinivasan, David Tannenbaum, Eliza Bivolaru, Jason Dana, Clintin Davis-Stober, Christilene du Plessis, Quentin Gronau, Andrew Hafenbrack, Eko Liao, Alexander Ly, Maarten Marsman, Toshio Murase, Israr Qureshi, Michael Schaerer, Nico Thornley, Christina Tworek, Eric-Jan Wagenmakers, Lynn Wong, Tabitha Anderson, Christopher Bauman, Wendy Bedwell, Victoria Brescoll, Andrew Canavan, Jesse Chandler, Erik Cheries, Sapna Cheryan, Felix Cheung, Andrei Cimpian, Mark Clark, Diana Cordon, Fiery Cushman, Peter Ditto, Thomas Donahue, Sarah Frick, Monica Gamez-Djokic, Rebecca Grady, Jesse Graham, Jun Gu, Adam Hahn, Brittany Hanson, Nicole Hartwich, Kristie Hein, Yoel Inbar, Lily Jiang, Tehlyr Kellogg, Deanna Kennedy, Nicole Legate, Timo Luoma, Heidi Maibuecher, Peter Meindl, Jennifer Miles, Alexandra Mislin, Daniel Molden, Matt Motyl, George Newman, Hoai Ngo, Harvey Packham, Philip Ramsay, Jennifer Ray, Aaron Sackett, Anne-Laure Sellier, Tatiana Sokolova, Walter Sowden, Daniel Storage, Xiaomin Sun, Jay J. Van Bavel, Anthony Washburn, Cong Wei, Erik Wetter, Carlos Wilson, Sophie-Charlotte Darroux, Eric Uhlmann,  (2016). The pipeline project:  Pre-publication independent replications of a single laboratory's research pipeline. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 55 - 67.

Research in progress
Title: Arrested development:  The long-term effects of early workload on team coordination and performance.
Description: The primary question of this research project is: What role do early experiences play in teams, and how do these experiences affect long-term performance? Teams and groups are critical building blocks of the 21st century organization. While the historical tendency of researchers is to examine these ideas in the laboratory setting, this does not reflect the dynamic, long-term experience of many managers and employees embedded within teams. Thus, the over-time effects of group processes and shared experiences are an area of team research that is both critically important and understudied.
Status: On-Going
Research Type: Scholarly

Title: Drained and distracted:  The interaction of member and team trust on member ability to focus.
Description: Decades of research have demonstrated that employees’ trust in leadership, at both the individual and team level, is positively related to their contributions to the organization. In this paper we answer ongoing calls for cross-level trust research, examining how team trust in leadership may impact individual members’ contributions above and beyond their own via ability to focus. We suggest that not personally trusting leadership, or being surrounded by team members who do not, both hurt the focal employee’s ability to focus with the former constituting distracting mental preoccupation (rumination) and the latter functioning as distracting external noise (gossip). Thus, low team trust exacerbates the impact of low member trust on ability to focus. We test and find support for our predictions in 3 complimentary studies: a field survey of employees in work teams, a controlled experiment of undergraduates, and an online sample of working adults.
Status: Writing Results
Research Type: Scholarly

Title: Goal networks and team collaboration
Status: On-Going
Research Type: Scholarly

Title: High risk, high reward:  Diverse teams, dyadic collaboration and team performance.
Status: Writing Results
Research Type: Scholarly

Title: Leader sleep devaluation
Description: We introduce the new construct of leader sleep devaluation, which we define as leader behaviors that signal to employees that sleep should be sacrificed for work. Drawing from social learning theory, we develop a framework to delineate the manner in which leader sleep devaluation undermines the sleep quantity and quality of subordinates. In Study 1, we develop an initial scale of leader sleep devaluation. In Study 2, we evaluate the content adequacy of that scale and reduce the items to a more manageable set. In Study 3, we situate leader sleep devaluation in a nomological network and evaluate its convergent and discriminant validity. In Study 4, we find that leader sleep devaluation has harmful effects on employee sleep, and that these effects occur above and beyond the effects of abusive supervision. In Studies 5 and 6, we find that subordinate sleep has a mediating role between leader sleep devaluation and subordinate unethical behavior. Overall, we find support for the effect of leader sleep devaluation on subordinate sleep and unethical behavior. This research shows not only how leaders can adversely influence the sleep and work experience of their subordinates, but also hints at future interventions that can be conducted to improve employee sleep
Status: Writing Results
Research Type: Scholarly

Title: Managing my manager: Reducing abusive supervision through emotional labor and impression management
Description: Victims of abusive supervision are more likely to engage in leader-directed retaliatory tactics, including hostility and deviance. Additionally, these employees also experience less effective methods of personal coping, including substance abuse or withdrawal. Although the literature identifies a variety of employee responses to abuse, they tend to share two commonalities. First, they emphasize one direction of influence—from the supervisor to the supervisee, making the supervisor’s behavior the causal factor and the employee’s behavior the response. Second, most studies have focused on employee outcomes such as wellbeing or withdrawal rather than a change in levels of abusive supervision itself, again emphasizing the employee as the endpoint of the abusive supervision process. Together, these emphases downplay the possibility that employees could influence their supervisors’ abusive behavior in the long-term. However, a more reciprocal relationship between supervisor actions and employee responses is in line with recent theory on employee emotional appraisals of abusive supervision. This theory suggests that employee responses, particularly those that are aggressive or regulated in style (that is, reactionary or strategic, respectively), are part of an explicit attempt from the subordinate to influence the behavior of the leader in a positive direction. By turning our focus to this upward path in the cyclical relationship rather than the traditional downward path, we can evaluate subordinate attempts to actively influence the likelihood of abuse.
Status: Writing Results
Research Type: Scholarly

Title: Social choice theory and partial allocation voting:  How should groups aggregate member preferences?
Description: Straw polling is a significant issue for group decision-making, both because of its prevalence and because of its negative effect on decision quality. In this paper, we test different straw poll voting methods suggested by social choice theory. The analysis of the findings shows that in a randomized experiment, information-poor voting methods (plurality) negatively affect decision quality, whereas more information-rich voting methods (rank order, allocation) actually positively affect decision quality. The paper argues that past research on straw polling in decision-making groups needs to be re-evaluated, as the vast amount of existing straw polling research was conducted using information-poor voting methods. We conclude by suggesting ways that organizations can implement information-rich voting methods to improve their decisions.
Status: Writing Results
Research Type: Scholarly

Title: The microdynamic patterns of collaboration:  Toward an emergent network theory of team diversity and performance.
Status: Writing Results
Research Type: Scholarly

Title: What about me? An event system theory approach to differentiated gratitude expressions.
Description: In this paper, we explore how differentiated gratitude expressions in a team—an experience in which an expression of gratitude is perceived as unequal or inequitable—impacts future collaboration choices of both thanked and unthanked team members. Research on gratitude typically finds it associated with positive outcomes. These positive outcomes are found for both the beneficiary (the one experiencing gratitude) and the benefactor (the target of expressed gratitude). However, gratitude expression in the context of workgroups, teams, and organizations represents more than just an emotional experience for an individual or a dyadic expression to a one beneficiary to one benefactor. In these more complex environments, both the experience of gratitude and its subsequent expression could be interpreted in multiple ways, and this could have unintended short-term and long-term consequences for employee affect, perceptions, and collaboration patterns.
Status: On-Going
Research Type: Scholarly

Presentations
Title: Symposium:  Gratitude at multiple levels of the organizations.
Location: Chicago, IL
Year: 2018

Title: What about me? The impact of differentiated gratitude expressions in teams.
Location: Chicago, IL
Year: 2018

Title: A network theory of team diversity
Location: Anahiem, CA
Year: 2016

Title: Sleep depriving leader behavior, subordinate sleep, and unethical behavior
Organization: University of Washington
Location: Vancouver, BC
Year: 2015

Title: The grateful workplace:  A tripartite model of gratitude in organizations.
Organization: University of Michigan
Location: Orlando, FL
Year: 2015

Title: Tough times ahead:  The persistent effects of process loss on teamwork
Organization: University of Washington
Location: Raleigh, NC
Year: 2014

Title: Pedagogical insights for teaching teamwork.
Location: Orlando, FL
Year: 2013

Title: Getting the best out of diverse teams:  Leadership moderators of information elaboration.
Organization: University of Houston
Location: Houston, TX
Year: 2012