Carl H. Lindner College of BusinessCarl H. Lindner College of BusinessUniversity of Cincinnati

Carl H. Lindner College of Business

Sherae Daniel

Assistant Professor
Professional Summary
Sherae Daniel
Sherae L. Daniel is an Assistant Professor of Operations, Business Analytics and Information Systems in the Carl H. Lindner College of Business at the University of Cincinnati. She earned her Ph.D. in Information Systems from the Robert H. Smith School of Business at the University of Maryland. Sherae’s research seeks to reveal how to best manage collaboration challenges in nontraditional work environments. In particular, she seeks to uncover the keys that will unlock doors to future success for OSS collaborators. Sherae’s research has been published or is forthcoming in premier outlets such as Information Systems Research, MIS Quarterly, and the Journal of Association for Information Systems. She is a member of the Association for Information Systems.
Contact Information
E-mail:
Office:
618A Carl H. Lindner Hall
Phone:
513-556-7175
Fax:
513-556-5499
Teaching Interest
  • Introduction to Information Systems, Excel, Spreadsheet Analytics, Database
Research Interest
  • Open source software, virtual teams
Education

Institution:
University of Maryland
Completed:
2007
Degree:
Ph D


Institution:
Carnegie Mellon University
Completed:
2001
Degree:
BS


Institution:
Carnegie Mellon University
Completed:
2001
Degree:
MS


Published Contributions

Sherae Daniel, Katherine Stewart,  (2016). Open source project success: Resource access, flow, and integration. Journal of Strategic Information Systems, 159-176.


Sherae Daniel, Ritu Agarwal, Katherine Stewart,  (2013). The Effects of Diversity in Global, Distributed Collectives: A Study of Open Source Project Success . Information Systems Research, .


Sherae Daniel, Likoebe Maruping, Marcelo Cataldo, James Herbsleb,  (2011). When Cultures Clash: Participation in Open Source Communities and its Implications for Organizational Commitment. International Conference of Information Systems, .


Sherae Daniel, Ilana Diamant,  (2010). Learning in Open-Source Software (OSS) Development: How Developer Interactions in Culturally Diverse Projects Impact the Acquisition of Collaboration- and Learning Skills. International Conference on Information Systems, .


Sherae Daniel, Anna Sidorova, Shobha Chengalur-Smith,  (2010). Sustainability of Free/Libre Open Source Projects: A Longitudinal Study. , .


Sherae Daniel, Pratyush Sharma, Rachel Chung,  (2010). The Impact of Person-Organization Fit on Turnover in Open Source Software Projects. , .


Sherae Daniel, Katherine Stewart, David Darcy,  ,  (2006). Opportunities and Challenges Applying Functional Data Analysis to the study of Open Source Software. Statistical Science, .



Accepted Contributions

Sherae Daniel, Likoebe Maruping , Marcelo Cataldo ,  (Accepted). Developer Centrality and the Impact of Value Congruence and Incongruence on Commitment and Code Contribution Activity in Open Source Software Communities. Management Information Systems Quarterly.


Sherae Daniel, Likoebe Maruping , Marcelo Cataldo , James Herbsleb ,  (Accepted). THE IMPACT OF IDEOLOGY MISFIT ON OPEN SOURCE SOFTWARE (OSS) COMMUNITIES AND COMPANIES . Management Information Systems Quarterly.


Sherae Daniel, Katherine Stewart,  (Accepted). Implications of Alter Project Resources and Participant. International Conference of Information Systems.




Research in progress






Title:
Single and Double-Loop Learning: Linking Open Source Software Developer Motivation, Contribution and Turnover Intentions

Description:
Under Review at Information Technology & People

Status:
On-Going

Research Type:
Scholarly


Title:
Sourcing Knowledge in Open Source Software Projects: The Impacts of Participant and Project Differences on Project Success

Description:
Open source software (OSS) projects source knowledge and expertise from a diverse base of globally distributed participants. Although participant differences can improve outcomes, diversity may have dysfunctional effects, depending upon project characteristics. This paper examines whether project and participant differences influence project success, and, if so, how? We propose a taxonomy of participant (culture, knowledge, and status) and project (development environment and connectedness) differences. We postulate main and moderating effects, which we test, using a four-year panel data set of 329 projects hosted on SourceForge. We show that connectedness difference reduces the positive impact of knowledge and status diversity on project success. Development environment difference has a U-shaped relationship with success. Further, when development environment difference is moderate, the impact of knowledge diversity is the most positive. We present the implications of these findings for theory and practice. JSIS Revise and Resubmit

Status:
On-Going

Research Type:
Scholarly


Title:
The Impact of Ideology Fit on Companies and OSS Communities

Description:
Corporate involvement in open source software (OSS) communities has increased substantially in recent years. Often this takes the form of company employees devoting their time to contribute code to these communities’ efforts. Ideology has traditionally served to motivate, coordinate and guide volunteer contributions to OSS communities. As employees are becoming an increasing proportion of the participants in OSS communities, the role of OSS ideology in guiding their commitment and code contributions is unknown. In this research, we argue that OSS ideology misfit has important implications for companies and the OSS communities to which their employees contribute. We conceptualize two different types of misfit: OSS ideology under-fit—whereby an employee embraces an OSS ideology more than the coworkers or OSS community does, and OSS ideology over-fit—whereby an employee perceives that the coworkers or OSS community embraces the OSS ideology more strongly than the employee does. To better understand the implications of these two types of misfit for employee commitment to the employer versus commitment to the OSS community, we conducted a field study of 186 employees who participate in an OSS community. We find interesting similarities and contrasts in the impact of the two different types of misfit on employee commitment to the employer versus commitment to the OSS community. We find that OSS ideology under-fit decreases employee commitment to the employer and commitment to the OSS community. In contrast, we find that OSS ideology over-fit increases commitment to the employer but decreases commitment to the OSS community. Finally, we find that employees’ commitment to their employer reinforces the impact of their commitment to the OSS community in driving ongoing code contributions. This provides a holistic view of OSS ideology and its impacts among an increasingly pervasive yet understudied type of participant in OSS research. It provides insights for companies that are considering assigning their employees to work in OSS communities as well as for OSS communities that are partnering with these companies.

Status:
Writing Results

Research Type:
Scholarly


Title:
The Impact of Network Position on the Relationship between Value Congruence and Individual Open Collaboration Activity

Description:
Open source software (OSS) communities enjoy success that comes from the contributions of developers, who in many cases, never meet face-to-face and collaborate primarily through technology-enabled means. With their fluid membership, such communities often rely on engaging the commitment of developers to their cause. Given the changing nature of OSS communities, developers face barriers in appreciating appropriate ways of contributing to the collaborative effort. Such uncertainty about how to contribute results in OSS communities losing developers as they devote their attention to other more welcoming communities. In this research we draw upon uncertainty reduction theory to argue that developers have two alternative avenues at their disposal to gain certainty about how to contribute: passive and interactive. Leveraging the person-environment fit perspective, we argue that congruence and incongruence in the OSS values of the developer and an OSS community serves as an avenue for passive approaches to gaining certainty; to the degree that appropriate ways of contributing are encoded in these values. Further, leveraging social network theory, we argue that centrality within the communities communication network constitutes an avenue for interactive approaches for gaining certainty about how to contribute. Using polynomial regression analysis, we analyze survey and archival data from 410 developers in an OSS community. Results suggest that developer centrality moderates the impact of congruence and incongruence in OSS values on commitment. Moreover, commitment fully mediates the impact of OSS value congruence and incongruence on developer contribution activity. We discuss the implications of our findings for research and practice.

Status:
On-Going

Research Type:
Scholarly