Carl H. Lindner College of BusinessCarl H. Lindner College of BusinessUniversity of Cincinnati

Carl H. Lindner College of Business

Sherae Daniel

Assistant Professor
Professional Summary
Sherae Daniel
Sherae L. Daniel is an Assistant Professor of Operations, Business Analytics and Information Systems in the Carl H. Lindner College of Business at the University of Cincinnati. She earned her Ph.D. in Information Systems from the Robert H. Smith School of Business at the University of Maryland. Sherae’s research seeks to reveal how to best manage collaboration challenges in nontraditional work environments. In particular, she seeks to uncover the keys that will unlock doors to future success for OSS collaborators. Sherae’s research has been published or is forthcoming in premier outlets such as Information Systems Research, MIS Quarterly, and the Journal of Association for Information Systems. She is a member of the Association for Information Systems.
Contact Information
E-mail:
Office:
618A Carl H. Lindner Hall
Phone:
513-556-7175
Fax:
513-556-5499
Teaching Interest
  • Introduction to Information Systems, Excel, Spreadsheet Analytics, Database
Research Interest
  • Open source software, virtual teams
Awards | Honors

Organization:
University of Cincinnati
Name:
Spring 2018 Dean's List of Teaching Excellence
Year Received:
2018


Organization:
University of Cincinnati
Name:
Fall 2017 Dean’s List of Teaching Excellence
Year Received:
2017


Name:
IS Women's Network: Advancing Women in IS Academia workshop
Year Received:
2014


Name:
Academy of Management Organizational Behavior Outstanding Reviewer Award
Year Received:
2009


Name:
University of Pittsburgh Grant
Year Received:
2009


Organization:
University of Pittsburgh
Name:
University of Pittsburgh International Business Center Grant
Year Received:
2009


Name:
AMCIS Doctoral Consortium
Year Received:
2007


Name:
AT&T Labs Fellow, 2002-2007
Year Received:
2007


Name:
KPMG Peat Marwick Foundation Doctoral Scholarship, 2002-2007
Year Received:
2007


Name:
OCIS AOM Doctoral Consortium
Year Received:
2007


Education

Institution:
University of Maryland
Completed:
2007
Degree:
Ph D


Institution:
Carnegie Mellon University
Completed:
2001
Degree:
BS


Institution:
Carnegie Mellon University
Completed:
2001
Degree:
MS


Published Contributions

Sherae Daniel, Katherine Stewart,  (2016). Open source project success: Resource access, flow, and integration. Journal of Strategic Information Systems, 159-176.


Sherae Daniel, Ritu Agarwal, Katherine Stewart,  (2013). The Effects of Diversity in Global, Distributed Collectives: A Study of Open Source Project Success . Information Systems Research, .


Sherae Daniel, Likoebe Maruping, Marcelo Cataldo, James Herbsleb,  (2011). When Cultures Clash: Participation in Open Source Communities and its Implications for Organizational Commitment. International Conference of Information Systems, .


Sherae Daniel, Ilana Diamant,  (2010). Learning in Open-Source Software (OSS) Development: How Developer Interactions in Culturally Diverse Projects Impact the Acquisition of Collaboration- and Learning Skills. International Conference on Information Systems, .


Sherae Daniel, Anna Sidorova, Shobha Chengalur-Smith,  (2010). Sustainability of Free/Libre Open Source Projects: A Longitudinal Study. , .


Sherae Daniel, Pratyush Sharma, Rachel Chung,  (2010). The Impact of Person-Organization Fit on Turnover in Open Source Software Projects. , .


Sherae Daniel, Katherine Stewart, David Darcy,  ,  (2006). Opportunities and Challenges Applying Functional Data Analysis to the study of Open Source Software. Statistical Science, .



Accepted Contributions

Sherae Daniel, Vishal Midha, Anol Bhattacherjee, Shivendu Singh,  (Accepted). Sourcing Knowledge in Open Source Software Projects: The Impacts of Internal and External Social Capital on Project Success. Journal of Strategic Information Systems.


Sherae Daniel, Likoebe Maruping , Marcelo Cataldo ,  (Accepted). Developer Centrality and the Impact of Value Congruence and Incongruence on Commitment and Code Contribution Activity in Open Source Software Communities. Management Information Systems Quarterly.


Sherae Daniel, Likoebe Maruping , Marcelo Cataldo , James Herbsleb ,  (Accepted). THE IMPACT OF IDEOLOGY MISFIT ON OPEN SOURCE SOFTWARE (OSS) COMMUNITIES AND COMPANIES . Management Information Systems Quarterly.


Sherae Daniel, Katherine Stewart,  (Accepted). Implications of Alter Project Resources and Participant. International Conference of Information Systems.




Research in progress






Title:
A Motivation-Hygiene Model of Open Source Software Code Contribution and Growth over Time: Understanding the Role of Developer Fit and Payment

Description:
Motivation for contributing to open source software development has largely been based on shared values. However, the increasing prevalence of payments to developers has created a challenge in balancing psychological and economic motivations. Experts argue about whether paying OSS developers helps or hurts projects because imbursement dampens the impact of intrinsic motivation. As the variety of motivations increases, managers face difficulty in understanding what to expect from developers over time. Using Herzberg’s motivation-hygiene framework, we theorize how developers’ perceptions of fit with the project and being paid to work interact to determine the level and growth of code contribution over time (trajectory). Using a survey of 564 developers working on 431 projects on the GitHub platform, we build a three-level growth model explaining the code contribution and its growth over a six-month period. We find that both fit with the project and being paid positively impact the level and growth of code contribution. However, there are differences in the impact of fit between paid and unpaid developers with regard to their level and growth of code contribution. Specifically, fit has a stronger positive impact on the level of code contribution for paid developers compared to unpaid developers. In contrast, for unpaid developers fit has a stronger impact on the growth of code contribution over time compared to paid developers. The implications of our work can be of interest to researchers, practitioners and organizations investing in open source projects.

Status:
Writing Results

Research Type:
Scholarly


Title:
Single and Double-Loop Learning: Linking Open Source Software Developer Motivation, Contribution and Turnover Intentions

Description:
Under Review at Information Technology & People

Status:
On-Going

Research Type:
Scholarly