Carl H. Lindner College of BusinessCarl H. Lindner College of BusinessUniversity of Cincinnati

Carl H. Lindner College of Business

Paul Ordyna

Assistant Professor
Professional Summary
Paul Ordyna
Paul Ordyna is an Assistant Professor of Accounting. He joined the University of Cincinnati after completing a PhD from Purdue University. Paul’s research interests are in the areas of taxation, capital markets and bankruptcy. Specifically, his research seeks to address the interactions and interrelationships between accounting and law. Professionally, Paul is a Certified Public Accountant licensed to practice in the State of Tennessee and a member of the Utah State Bar (Inactive). He also has over five years professional experience employed with public accounting and industry leaders such as PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP, Comcast Cable and Merit Medical Systems.
Contact Information
E-mail:
Office:
329 Carl H. Lindner Hall
Phone:
513-556-9075
Fax:
513-556-6278
Teaching Interest
  • Taxation, Estate Planning, Financial Accounting
Research Interest
  • Taxation, Bankruptcy, Capital Markets, Financial Accounting
Education

Institution:
Purdue University
Location:
West Lafayette, IN
Major:
Business Administration
Dissertation:
Voluntary Going Concern Disclosure and Bankruptcy Planning
Completed:
2015
Degree:
Ph D


Institution:
University of Mississippi
Location:
Oxford, MS
Major:
Law
Completed:
2010
Degree:
JD


Institution:
University of Mississippi
Location:
Oxford, MS
Major:
Accounting
Completed:
2009
Degree:
MS


Institution:
Brigham Young University
Location:
Provo, UT
Major:
Accounting
Completed:
2001
Degree:
BS


Research in progress

Title:
Disaggregated Earnings Forecasts and Acquisition Financing

Description:
Using a logistic model, I test the relation between M&A financing and the decision to disaggregate earnings forecasts. The value of the acquirer's stock is dependent on the true value of the acquiring firm. If stock is offered in an acquisition, managers will disaggregate earnings information to either add credibility to financial information or respond to market participant's demand for supplemental information, thus promoting the acquisition transaction. I find that firms using mostly stock to finance M&A are more likely to provide disaggregate earnings guidance and that the incentives to disaggregate guidance vary throughout the M&A transactional window. Alternatively, because the value of cash is independent of the true value of the acquirer, I find that firms offering mostly cash to finance M&A are less likely to issue disaggregate earnings forecasts.

Status:
Writing Results

Research Type:
Scholarly


Title:
Going Concern Disclosure and Bankruptcy Planning

Description:
Even before the FASB issued the final standard requiring management to assess and disclose the firm's ability to continue as a going concern, many firms voluntarily disclosed going concern doubts prior to bankruptcy. Using a multinomial logistic model, I test the relation between a firm's decision to voluntary disclose going concern doubts and relevant firm characteristics. I find that leverage, especially relating to secured and unsecured loans, is an important consideration in the choice to voluntarily disclose doubts of going concern. I also find that the firm's auditors can assist management in the assessment of going concern doubts evidenced by more timely disclosures. Other determinants, such as whether the firm is a private or public company, analyst following and certain bankruptcy strategies, are influential in the firm's decision to disclose doubts of going concern.

Status:
Writing Results

Research Type:
Scholarly


Title:
Investors and Boards Reactions to Accounting for Income Tax Failures

Description:
We examine stock market reactions and CFO turnover after material control weaknesses and restatements due to accounting for income taxes. Prior research provides mixed evidence about the seriousness of these accounting failures. We find evidence consistent with the stock market treating accounting for income tax failures the same as other accounting failures. We then find evidence that CFO turnover is less than expected after accounting for income tax control weaknesses but more than expected after accounting for income tax restatements. Additional analysis suggests that this pattern of CFO turnover is not due simply to the complexity of accounting for income taxes, but rather other idiosyncrasies of accounting for income taxes such as timing and in house talent.

Status:
Writing Results

Research Type:
Scholarly


Presentations

Title:
Investors and Boards Reactions to Accounting for Income Tax Failures
Organization:
Ball State University
Location:
Muncie, IN
Year:
2016


Title:
Investors and Boards Reactions to Accounting for Income Tax Failures
Organization:
Brigham Young University
Location:
Provo, Utah
Year:
2016


Title:
Going Concern Disclosure and Bankruptcy Planning
Organization:
Brigham Young University
Location:
Provo, Utah
Year:
2016