Carl H. Lindner College of BusinessCarl H. Lindner College of BusinessUniversity of Cincinnati

Carl H. Lindner College of Business

CFP Courses

FIN 4001: Corporate Finance (3 credit hours)

In this course you will develop the analytical tools necessary for analyzing corporate financing decisions.  Central to these decisions is the firm’s cost of capital and value of the firm.  You will learn how to compute the cost of capital and how to apply it to numerous questions like what is the value of the firm, how should the firm raise capital, what is the optimal mix of debt and equity, what should the firm’s payout (dividend) policy be, and how the concept of options is applicable to corporate finance decisions etc. Time value of money, financial statements, some lessons in the capital market history, risk and return, the security market line are therefore prerequisite (i.e., FIN 3080) to the course. You must not take this course without it.

In this course, students will develop the analytical tools necessary for analyzing corporate investment (capital budgeting) and financing decisions. You will learn how to evaluate projects, account for uncertainty in forecast cash flows, compute the cost of capital, analyze the value of the firm, determine how the firm should raise capital, understand theories of the optimal mix of debt and equity and the firm’s payout (dividend) policy, and be introduced to alternate views of executive decision-making.

 

FIN 4011: Investments (3 credit hours)

Students should expect to learn the fundamental principles of investment management. The goal is to equip students with the tools necessary to make good investment decisions. The course is organized into three segments. The first segment introduces the background knowledge, including asset classes, security markets, and investment companies. The second segment covers the classic portfolio theory, including risk and return, asset allocation, and efficient diversification. The third segment covers modern asset pricing theory, including the Capital Asset Pricing Model, the Efficient Market Hypothesis, and behavioral finance. Investment decisions are based on rigorous analysis of financial market data and economic news. The Bloomberg terminal is one of the most widely used computer software systems that financial professionals use to access data and news. Students will learn how to use the basic functions of Bloomberg terminal by completing an 8-hour online course of Bloomberg Market Concepts (BMC). During the course, current market events and industry applications will be discussed. The course focuses mostly on equity, leaving advanced materials on fixed income securities to FIN4014 (Fixed Income) and derivatives to FIN4021 (Derivatives).

 

FIN 4041: Financial Modeling (3 credit hours)

This course is a very hand’s on course, designed to enable students to build skills useful in business and utilize financial models in Excel. In the course will explore forecasting, data analysis, valuation methodologies, present value and future value, NPV, amortization schedules, bond valuation, and the translation of finance formulas to excel. This is a very hands-on class so class attendance and participation is a significant part of your grade. The course will pull material from multiple disciplines, especially accounting.  With this course students are able to

1.      understand how to utilize Excel to in evaluating Time Value of Money, Valuation, Capital Structure, Capital Budgeting, Financial Planning, International Finance, and Options and Corporate Finance evaluations.

2.      understand how to evaluate the output of the above utilizing Excel.

 

IRM 4110:  Life and Health Insurance (3 credit hours)

This course provides a detailed survey of the legal, financial, pricing, underwriting, and strategic issues involved in the variety of different life and health insurance products available in the marketplace.  The course examines the variety of different products offered, highlighting how the differences affect their pricing and the service they provide.  Much of the course concerns determining which contracts or products are best suited to solve a variety of problems faced by individuals and businesses. The course will also examine the issues raised by major regulatory reforms. Describes the types of goals various types of customers of such products can have.  The learning objectives of the course are to have students be able to: (1) describe what the differences between the various products imply with respect to performance on the variety of customer goals, (2) evaluate whether the specific terms of one contract or product dominates another, (3) identify the major sources and implications of regulation, with a historical perspective, (4) describe how the regulatory environment affects the efficacy of various product features in terms of performance for the customer and in terms of profitability to the insurance provider, and (5) compare the efficacy of life insurance products to alternative products offered by other financial services organizations (e.g., mutual funds, banks, etc.)

 

ACCT 3072: Introduction to Tax (3 credit hours)

This course is designed to provide comprehensive coverage of individual federal income tax issues. The student will understand filing requirements, income inclusion, expense deduction and other special issues related to individual income tax returns. In addition to wage and business income, the course covers income from the sale of property. In addition to business deductions, the course covers the personal expenses and losses that are deductible by individuals. Throughout the course, there is a focus on tax planning in order to minimize the negative impact of the federal income tax.

 

ACCT 5146/6046: Estate and Gift Taxation Planning (2 credit hours)

This course provides a detailed survey of taxation and estate planning (including the probate process, trusts, life insurance, deductions and tax credits, depreciation, asset categorization and business assets, investments) from the perspective of a professional financial advisor providing tax and estate planning strategies for a client (including an individual or business entity).

The course examines the topics above, providing the student with an in-depth understanding of the various elements of personal income taxation and how estate and tax planning can effectively limit tax exposures given the specific goals and circumstances of the client.

This course covers the following topics on the Principle Topics List of the Certified Financial Planner (CFP) Board of Standards: 32-43 and 53-73.

With this course, students are able to:
1.       Identify and implement the appropriate estate planning process, with an understanding of how the implementation impacts estate and gift taxes.

2.       Identify and describe the various components of individual taxation.

3.       Identify and describe the Estate Planning process, from planning to implementation.

4.       Describe and implement the various Estate Planning tools and documents and explain their appropriate application.   

5.       Describe the regulatory environment and the rules concerning qualifications, implementation, taxes, and distribution that apply to the variety of taxation and estate planning issues. 

 

IRM 4155/6055: Retirement Planning and Employee Benefits (3 credit hours)

This course provides a detailed survey of the strategic, legal, financial, and regulatory issues involved in the provision of employee benefits and retirement planning. 

The course examines the variety of different products available, highlighting the differences across products and how these differences affect the efficacy of each product given the specific goals and circumstances of the client and/or employee.

The material is presented from the perspective of a professional financial advisor consulting with a firm on the types of employee and retirement benefits to provide (with a consideration of the costs and benefits to the employer that results) and from the perspective of individuals making selections among the various retirement and benefit plans available in the marketplace.  

This course covers the following topics on the Principle Topics List of the Certified Financial Planner (CFP) Board of Standards: 44-52.

With this course, students are able to:
1.       Describe the types of goals various types of clients and/or employees can have with respect to retirement products and employee benefits.

2.       Identify and describe each step in the employee benefit planning process.

3.       Identify and describe each of the potential types of employee benefits typically provided (e.g., health insurance, disability insurance, fringe benefits, etc…). 

4.       Describe the variety of retirement vehicles that are available, being able to advise a potential client or employee on the pros and cons of each in specific circumstances; be able to evaluate whether specific features dominate other features.

5.       Describe the regulatory environment and the set of rules concerning qualifications, implementation, taxes, and distribution that apply to the variety of employee benefits and retirement plans. 

6.       Optimally design an employee benefit and retirement plan to achieve the goals of the employer given differences in the costs to the employer and the benefits to employees of various plan features.  

 

FIN 4160/6060: Fundamentals of Financial Planning (1 credit hour)

This course examines how to develop and implement an effective financial plan from the perspective of a financial planning professional advising individual clients.  The course focuses on both (1) which strategies are most effective at achieving a specific set of client goals and (2) the process of managing the relationship with the client.  

FIN 6060 consists of text-book and case coverage of the fundamental principles of developing and implementing a financial plan, extensively examining the elements of an effective financial plan, the information required to make effective financial planning decisions, the set of decisions that must be customized to meet the client’s needs, a set of appropriate decision-making criterion, and the elements of an effective process for producing the financial plan and a productive advisor/client relationship. Through case analyses, students are exposed to examples of effective and ineffective financial plans. 

FIN 6060 is a pre-requisite for the one semester credit hour course FIN 6061 (Financial Plan Capstone), the Certified Financial Planning (CFP) capstone course where the student creates an effective financial plan for an actual client. Since FIN 6061 requires the integration of all the financial planning concepts and topics developed throughout the sub-program focused on the CFP designation, as well as the integration of the material specifically focused on the creation of financial plans, this course satisfies the capstone requirement of the MS-FIN program for graduate students.  

This course covers the following topics on the Principle Topics List of the Certified Financial Planner (CFP) Board of Standards: General Principles (CFP Topics 1-12), Interpersonal Communication (CFP Topics 74-75), and Professional Conduct (CFP Topics 76-78). 

With this course, students are able to:

1.      Be able to diagram the personal financial planning process.

2.      Recognize unethical practices in the financial planning profession.

3.      Explain the functions and products of financial institutions.

4.      Compare mechanisms for controlling personal and professional liability.

5.      Analyze a client’s degree of risk and loss aversion.

6.      Demonstrate effective structured communication.

7.      Explain the CFP Board’s Code of Ethics and Professional Responsibility.

8.      Integrate the Practice Standards in developing and communicating a financial plan for a client.

9.      Be able to establish and define the client relationship.

10.    Gather data and frame goals and objectives.

11.    Evaluate the client’s financial position.

12.    Develop a comprehensive plan.

13.    Communicate the plan to a client.

 

FIN 4161/6061: Financial Planning Capstone (3 credit hours)

This course is the companion course to FIN 4160/6060 (Fundamentals of Financial Planning), which examines how to develop and implement an effective financial plan from the perspective of a financial planning professional advising individual clients.  FIN 6061 (Financial Planning  Capstone) is the Certified Financial Planning (CFP) capstone course where the student creates an effective financial plan for an actual client.  This course has students gain experience with the following topics on the Principle Topics List of the Certified Financial Planner (CFP) Board of Standards: General Principles (CFP Topics 1-12), Interpersonal Communication (CFP Topics 74-75), and Professional Conduct (CFP Topics 76-78).

There will be no class lectures for this course.  Rather, students will be assigned an actual client at the beginning of the term in which FIN 6061 is taken and it will be the students responsibility to, using all of the principles discussed in FIN 6060, manage the relationship with the client so that the deadlines for the three deliverables (described in detail below) are met.  Students will be able to consult with the course instructor throughout the term for clarification or to resolve any issues that arise. 

With this course, students are able to:

1.                  Integrate the Practice Standards in developing and communicating a financial plan for a client.

2.                  Be able to establish and define the client relationship.

3.                  Interview the client to gather data and frame goals and objectives.

4.                  Evaluate the client’s financial position.

5.                  Develop a comprehensive plan.

6.                  Communicate the plan to a client.

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